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Alcohol - Last Update: December 2019

Brandy is made from pomace, mash or wine of any other fruit. Aka distilled wine. It generally tastes like wine made from grapes.

Gin is made from neutral grain alcohol and distilled or re-distilled with juniper berries. It has a distinctive flavor and aroma of pine. Some call it "Christmas tree" taste.

Rum is made from either pure cane sugar, a syrup, or molasses. No matter the base, the underlying flavor profile of rum is a sweet, toasted sugar.

Vodka is made from either potatoes, grains, fruits or even sugar. It does not have flavor unless mixed with other drinks or flavored with fruits.

Whiskey is made from grain mash. It generally tastes like beer.

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Coffee

Cappuccino: This beloved drink is two ounces of espresso topped with another two ounces of steamed milk and finished with two ounces of foamed milk.

Americano: Still not your regular drip coffee , this beverage is two ounces of espresso mixed with three ounces of hot water.

Mocha: The perfect cure for a chocolate craving, this beverage is 60 ml of espresso, 50 ml of chocolate, and 30 ml of steamed milk.

Flat White: With two ounces of espresso to four ounces of steamed milk , this drink may be a little more palatable if you’re not a fan of strong coffee flavor.

Latte: This beverage is a blend of two ounces of espresso and ten ounces of steamed milk. It’s topped with the tiniest hint—about 2 ml—of foamed milk.

 

Espresso (Short Black): • 1 Shot of espresso in an espresso cup

Double Espresso (Doppio): • 2 shots of espresso in an espresso cup

Short Macchiato: • 1 Shot of espresso in a short glass or espresso cup• A dollop of steamed milk and foam placed on top of the espresso

Long Macchiato: • 2 shots of espresso in a tumbler glass or cup• A dollop of steamed milk and foam placed on top of the espresso
-A little milder than an espresso; short macchiato taste bitter but less harsh than an espresso shot. Long macchiato is stronger in taste; it has a double shot of espresso that makes it stronger and bitter.

Ristretto: • Extract a standard espresso shot with half the amount of water.• Alternatively turn off a normal espresso extraction before the espresso starts to blonde

Long Black (Americano): • Fill a cup with 2/3rds full of hot water• Extract 1 shot of espresso over the hot water
-In simplified terms, it could be said that they are diluted espresso shots. It is bitter and strong; an Americano is usually taken without flavoring or sugar. They are rich and aromatic, but lack any sort of creamy or milky texture.

Café Latte: • Extract 1 shot of espresso into a tumbler glass• Add steamed milk• 1cm of micro-foam on top of the steamed milk
-A bit towards the milder side, lattes taste less strong due to the milk content. The ratio of 1 part espresso and 3-5 parts steamed milk makes this the perfect coffee for people looking for coffees with a slightly less strong and bitter tasting.

Cappuccino: • Extract 1 shot of espresso into a cup• Add steamed milk• Add 2-3cm of micro-foam on top of the steamed milk• Sprinkle chocolate on top of the coffee
-Loved for its creamy texture and taste; A cappuccino has more milk foam. Moreover, when ordering a cup of cappuccino, it is important to keep in mind that it is less voluminous than a latte because it has a higher ratio of milk foam. Creamier in taste, cappuccinos are layered with textured milk foam that adds that extra rich texture.

Flat White: • 1 shot of espresso into a cup• Add steamed milk into the cup but no micro-foam
-They taste similar to a cappuccino but lack that extra flavor that cappuccino gets from chocolate dusting and foam as toppings.

Piccolo Latte: • 1 shot of espresso or 1 ristretto shot of espresso in a espresso cup• Add steamed milk and small amount of micro-foam
-Though bitter, the harshness of the espresso shot is lessened by the addition of rich milk.

Mocha: • Extract 1 shot of espresso into a cup• Add one spoon of chocolate powder into the espresso shot and mix• Add steamed milk• Add 2-3cm of micro-foam• Sprinkle chocolate powder on top
-Loved by many, these hot drinks have a lovely hot chocolate meets coffee taste. The bitterness of the espresso shot is mellowed down to a great extent by using the milk and chocolate powder.

Affogato: • Add one scoop of vanilla ice-cream into a tumbler glass milk• Pour a single or double shot of espresso over the vanilla ice-cream
-Creamy and delicious, the scoop of vanilla ice-cream in a shot of espresso makes affogato sweet lovers favorite. The bitterness and harshness of the espresso shot is mellowed out by the large scoop of vanilla ice cream goodness.

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Red Wine vs White Wine

Red wines are heavier and more complex than white wine, and often tend to be less sweet.
 

White wines have a wide range of taste. Some white wines are very sweet, and others dry. White wine has light, fruity flavors. White wines pair with fish, poultry, pork, and fruit.

Red wines tend to be on the bitter side, with a puckering taste. Red wine is bolder and has more complexity. Red wines go great with beef, pork, chocolate, and cheeses.
 

The main difference between red and white wines is the amount of tannins they have. Since tannins largely come from the grape skins, red wines have more of them than white wines. Red wine acquires it's tannins in the process of maceration (leaving juice to mix together with the skin, seeds and woody bits). It is the tannins and skins of the red grapes which are released into the wine that contribute to the deep color and flavor of red wine. Tannins have a slightly bitter taste and create a dry puckery sensation in the mouth and in the back of the throat; and often lend a wonderful complexity to red wine. They also help preserve the wine. This is why red wines are usually aged longer than white wines.


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